FAQ’s

EYPC Frequently Asked Questions

1. What is the role of other community organizations in EYPC implementation?
2. You mentioned “walking communities” to engage healthy communities. Can you explain that idea?
3. I may have missed this but just to confirm there is no cost to this training?
4. This seems like a lot of commitment; is it truly worth the effort?
5. Will there be regular updates after we have begun this process?
6. What about the evaluation costs?
7. Will the legislative advocacy part conflict with “no lobbying” part of Fed. and state funders?
8. How does EYPC meet Illinois civic education requirements and social science learning standards?
9. How adaptable or responsive is EYPC to our community’s unique situations or needs?
10. If I score low on the readiness assessment scale does that mean the work I am doing with youth isn’t on the right track?
11. My youth select the community or school level issue and they decide what they want to do, like organizing a rally or making a video or radio spot to raise awareness of their issue. We teach youth the skills they need, and they implement their plan. What more does EYPC offer?
12. Why don’t you train youth to facilitate EYPC?
13. Doesn’t the amount of time necessary make EYPC too demanding to be practical for both the facilitator and youth? Is there anything like EYPC-lite?


1. What is the role of other community organizations in EYPC implementation?

Working in collaboration with other community organizations or agencies is a critical part of EYPC program implementation in your community. For example, one previous implementer reports that their local health department was critical in laying the groundwork for passing their county retail tobacco licensing ordinance that went to final passage through the efforts of EYPC youth.


2. You mentioned “walking communities” to engage healthy communities. Can you explain that idea?

This refers to a variety of policies that may make communities more pedestrian-friendly. For example, many communities pass ordinances that require new developments to include sidewalks and bikeways. Other communities create walkways or bikeways that safely connect neighborhoods and shopping areas together.


3. I may have missed this but just to confirm there is no cost to this training?

There is no cost for attending EYPC training or for the meals and materials provided at training. Trainees and their agencies are responsible for their travel costs and staff time to attend training, unless a sponsoring organization is covering travel costs.


4. This seems like a lot of commitment; is it truly worth the effort?

According to the words of one previous EYPC implementer, “It may seem daunting, and it is definitely some work, but it is so worthwhile and so rewarding. It truly is a win-win-win: for the youth, for the community, and for public health or the policy issue you decide to work on. It is amazing to see the youth transform, become more confident, well-spoken and educated.”


5. Will there be regular updates after we have begun this process?

EYPC program development staff will maintain contact with facilitators through email updates. We will also provide a minimum of two hours of individual, direct technical assistance with evaluation and program implementation. Regular updates and information will also be available through the EYPC Facebook page.


6. What about the evaluation costs?

All costs associated with evaluation are covered by CPRD, including on request analysis and reporting back to the site agency or system implementing EYPC.


7. Will the legislative advocacy part conflict with no lobbying part of Fed. and state funders?

We are careful about how we phrase this work, focusing on educating the community and decision makers about the potential of a given policy to reduce the problem or promote health. Youth EYPC activities would not be considered “lobbying” or “direct advocacy”. Any such activities conducted by youth would necessarily be outside of the formal structures of this program. Part of the EYPC training will specifically address this.


8. How does EYPC meet Illinois civic education requirements and social science learning standards?

See here.


9. How adaptable or responsive is EYPC to our community’s unique situations or needs?

Depending on your organization’s limitations, you can make adaptations to still implement the program. You will get assistance with customizing the EYPC curriculum for your community’s situation at the trainings.


10. If I score low on the readiness assessment scale does that mean the work I am doing with youth isn’t on the right track?

No, it doesn’t mean you are on the wrong track. All it means is that from past experience with EYPC projects, we know that EYPC has the greatest chance of creating change when the community has, at a minimum, solvable problems that are well understood, adult youth educators and youth who are fired up about making a difference. Communities with low EYPC readiness scores may simply not be organized to engage youth…yet! We would like to work with you to determine how to prepare a community to value and work with its youth.


11. My youth select the community or school level issue and they decide what they want to do, like organizing a rally or making a video or radio spot to raise awareness of their issue. We teach youth the skills they need, and they implement their plan. What more does EYPC offer?

EYPC can add to what you are already doing. You’ve identified 2 of the 4 parts of EYPC: Define the Issue and Deliver the Message. We believe that the other two parts are also important: Determine the Decision Makers and Discover Local Data (to strengthen the message that youth eventually deliver). In addition, raising awareness is only one part of a change process. EYPC is a proven process to teach youth how to create formal change and really improve their communities.


12. Why don’t you train youth to facilitate EYPC?

Youth leaders learn to successfully lead activities within EYPC once they have experienced a full EYPC project with the guidance of an adult EYPC facilitator. In fact, 2nd and 3rd year participants are super recruiters to EYPC project groups and are essential peer leaders. The trouble is that organizing and facilitating EYPC activities takes more time than youth usually have to devote.


13. Doesn’t the amount of time necessary make EYPC too demanding to be practical for both the facilitator and youth? Is there anything like EYPC-lite?

As EYPC is implemented in more communities, we’ll find out which issues are important and what activities seem to be most useful. We continually evaluate implementation of EYPC in this way and will learn along with you.